Peak Ten-Eleven-Twelve and Bear Peak

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Another awesome Idaho Summits outing blends just the right amount of hard work, social, and fun climbing.

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Earlier in the day, Team Old Fart had been playing in the southern Lost Rivers. We then made our way to the Lemhi's Summit Creek campground, right across the road from the koi pond. That's Bear Mountain in the background.

 

Trailhead

In this shot, you can see both our two peaks, with Ten-Eleven-Twelve on the right and the massive Bear Peak at center.

I hear the party lasted until almost 11, but this old guy was firmly pressing his Thermarest at a little before 10.

Trailhead

When we got to our trailhead up Summerhouse Canyon, the sun was just getting high enough to take the edge off the morning's chill.

Us old-timers were shocked at how promptly we all left the campground, and even more shocked by how quickly the group got on the move- even WITH Big Dan taking the group photo.

Trailhead

And they're off!

The first section is an easy road, good for warming up the muscles. Some need more warm-up than others (note the photographer is the last in line here).

Sunrise on the Pioneers

Right after that, it was straight up the ridge. And the ridge was steep. So gain was quick and we were soon doing a little fun post-holing.

Sunrise on the Pioneers

That's the summit on the left, but some of the faster folks in the group have already left it heading over to Bear.

 

Sunrise on the Pioneers

Meanwhile, others were eating and socializing on Ten-Eleven-Twelve.

It was about here that I realized where we were. Not that I was lost- Dan and I had climbed Big Windy Peak a while back, and while on Big Windy we had been staring at this mountain, saying, "Wow! We gotta climb that some day." Well, apparently THIS was that day!

No snowshoes

But enough reminiscing. The day wasn't getting any shorter, so we set off for some more post-holing. That's looking back at Ten-Eleven-Twelve in the background.

No snowshoes

The first part of Bear's ridge is fairly broad with trees. Then it narrows down considerably. This is also where it gets fun.

Camp
Naturally, no one feels like taking pictures where it is scariest (and most photogenic). So you will have to believe me when I say that in places, this ridge is pretty narrow. In others, it's just right for two icons of the Idaho climbing scene to have a chat- that's Big Dan and SuperDave. Camp
Here Jordan tightens whatever it is you tighten when it starts to look sketchy. Camp
The ridge kept going, and going, and... Camp
Teak seemed to be enjoying herself. Camp

Summit.

We were pretty spread out on the ridge, so people sort of trickled in. There was a bit of wind, so those that had arrived were wearing everything they brought plus were hunkering down on the lee side. Despite the cold, fellowship and good humor abounded.

Camp

It finally got to be too chilly to hang out, or we might still be up there cracking jokes.

Heading off the top down the main spur, it was rolly-rock hell. But that quickly turned into a walkable snow drift, which turned into a wild butt glissade through, around, and over avy debris and live trees.

Camp

Then the traditional Idaho wander through the sage brush, but not a bad one at all. We had to wait for Andrew and company a bit, but it was all good and we were just being overly protective.

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